[Featured Resource] Legal Empowerment of Informal Workers Formalizing Street Vending as a Tool for Poverty Reduction

This week’s profiled resource is titled " Legal Empowerment of Informal Workers Formalizing Street Vending as a Tool for Poverty Reduction". To contribute to this longstanding debate about formalization as a tool of empowerment, this article analyses the effects of a recent formalization programme for street vendors in the city of Bogotá, Colombia. Based on 169 structured interviews with formalized street vendors, this report brings empirical data to the debate about the ability of law to contribute to the empowerment and development of informal workers.

More about Legal Empowerment of Informal Workers Formalizing Street Vending as a Tool for Poverty Reduction:

Being poor, uneducated and unemployed can be a crime in many places in the world, particularly when you decide to sell food or other products in the streets. The penalties can be as high as six months in prison in countries like Egypt, and can include the confiscation of their goods or fines that have to be paid to the municipality. The plight of global street vendors can be exemplified with the story of Mohamed Bouazizi, the Tunisian fruit and vegetable vendor who set himself on fire in 2010 as a protest after the confiscation of his goods by the police authorities, becoming a catalyst for the Tunisian revolution and the Arab Spring.

You can access this resource in our library at the following link:

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The Featured Resource is a short profile of a key resource found in the resource library of the Global Legal Empowerment Network. These resources can be older or brand new, but they all touch on important themes within legal empowerment. If you have a resource you would like to profile with the network, upload it directly at this link or email it to community@namati.org

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