Human rights in africa

Extensive human rights abuses still occur in Africa. In your opinion, how can Africa move forward and establish a good human rights system? And what are the causes of these abuses?

2 Likes

Hello colleagues. Thank you for this question and issue. In the first place, communities and institutions need capacity building in human rights, what are human rights all about and after understanding them then we can understand how best we can pursue them through avoiding causes and not causing harm to others in bid achieve human rights. Ignorance on human rights is the biggest challenge in communities and leaders take advantage of this. For example the constitution of Uganda says that all power belongs to the people (chapter one part 1-sovereignty of the people). But if we were to do an assessment, how many people in the rural community could know this. This what empowers them in the long run and they can use to claim their rights as well as their responsibilities and duties towards the same.

Let us create community awareness on human rights then systems can always be established by communities in collaboration with other stakeholders to look out the causes of abuses and address them as they happen.

Stay safe. Nsengiyumva

3 Likes

Indeed! Thank you Deogratias!

1 Like

First, the root cause of human right abuses in Africa is abuse of power which stems from the lumping of the all the executive powers to the president. The executive power of government needs to be divided into two, and each independent of another. That is the only way to establish a good human rights system in Africa.

2 Likes

You are right Chika, abuses in Africa is also amplified with dirty politics we experience in Africa.

2 Likes

Human rights in Africa has been perceived as NGO business. Infact people only raise the voice about human rights atrocities when they need to capture the attention of the donors. Most organizations that floss with the phrase ‘human rights’ have many questionable deals that negate the rights-based approach If people were genuinely concerned about the rights of others as well as themselves, they would take individual responsibility in their thoughts, words and actions. I am thankful that karma always catches up with this hypocrisy

1 Like

Thank you my dear sister. I strongly believe that Africa must find African solutions to African problems. Learning is there whenever one needs to learn and we can learn negatively or positively as well. Communities and institutions in Africa seem not to understand what human rights means and we may not blame them because of the way governance was introduced to Africa. Remember in the wake of slave trade, colonial, and neo-colonialism then we bring human rights. Now here, Africa communities and institutions must seek Africa understanding of human rights in the context of Africa and learn best practices from those who have performed better in this sector either in Africa or outside Africa.

Stay safe, Merry Christmas.

1 Like

The amplification of human right issues is vastly political and stems from the failure of states instrument to properly mirror actions represented by written laws and regulations. The will to drive change and rigorous support is lacking in individuals and family because that is the nucleus of the society.

1 Like

This topic is a very sensitive topic, especially ofcourse in Africa. My name is samira Gadaffi. Honestly the only solution to this is first of all, take nigeria my country as a case study. About 60% are uneducated, and being uneducated to them means that all this things aren’t relevant. They only talk about their rights indoors but they don’t see to it that their tights aren’t stepped on therefore voicing it out. I think rights of humans should be clearly made and known like a national anthem so whenever these rights are violated, u know it has been violated. Awareness of such is very important. Communities and institutions are a better place to make this awareness known and it should be passed by strict laws that will govern these rights if not they will be violated and nothing will be done about the culprits.

1 Like

I suspect that there is no single answer to this question and that the people who are likely to see this question in this forum will have different experiences and will subsequently see the frailties and opportunities to combat human rights abuses in different ways. My experience focuses upon the judicial implications upon those who perpetrate these crimes. A collective intent from the local authorities, NGOs, Charities, UN and any other bodies who have influence has to be upon the development of a framework that appropriately collects evidence from the victims and witnesses of these crimes in order to create a strong body of evidence, against the perpetrators, who will often be repeat offenders. A solid body of evidence, whilst protecting the identify of those who gave evidence, can then be used to convince the local authorities that a prosecution needs to happen. The ability or willingness of the local authorities to prosecute these crimes might be questionable, however the presence of the evidential statements can be used as proof of the crimes by the organisations previously mentioned, who subsequently can apply pressure upon the local government/authorities to focus upon the implementation of best practice judicial model, were evidence is heard and an impartial jury decide guilt and ultimately sentence. Once this is achieved the perpetrators of these crimes will start to be aware that there is a consequence to their actions. So, in summary not a quick or easy resolution but one I believe is a necessary path and something that we are already starting to support in Africa.