Using IDs to enforce rights - and prevent child marriage

When discussing citizenship rights, we often point to how legal identity documents can facilitate access to based services like health care, education, and banking and civil/political rights like voting. Legal identity documents can also be the key to enforcing many other rights or to prevent rights abuses - like child marriage.

In the below blog post, Lucia Hammer of the World Bank highlights the story of Rubi, a young girl from Bangladesh, to show how documentation is essential in preventing child marriage - particularly in countries where child marriage is prohibited by law yet remains a widespread practice:

What kinds of rights can people access or enforce more effectively with legal identity documentation in the places where you work? @Purity_Wadegu @zia @helenamarambio @ManishaPoudel @namati_citizenship @stellaobita

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@Laura Goodwin well, child marriages in Kenya have also reduced as an ID is essential when registering. Land rights too. Since without an ID card one can’t register his title deed.

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However, UNICEF statistics indicate that birth registration in Kenya in the rural areas is only 57%. The majority of child marriages in Africa and probably Kenya tend to occur in the rural areas. Thus if the problem is not addressed at the stage of birth registration, the Identification card process may fail to capture the true age of the child, resulting in slippages and errors in the age of even card holders, no?

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