Webinar: OGP & The Year of Justice (14 March 2019)

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(Coco Lammers) #1

Thank you for joining us during the OGP & Year of Justice webinar, that explored how our community can leverage the Open Government Partnership to advance #JusticeForAll in 2019: “The Year of Justice”. During this webinar, we discussed how justice has grown in OGP, heard directly from others as to how they managed to use the OGP to advance legal empowerment. We learned about the upcoming OGP Summit taking place in Ottawa Canada, and discussed how you can participate and leverage this moment to advance justice at home.

Founded in 2011, Open Government Partnership (OGP) provides a platform for civil society to work with their governments to draft and implement policy commitments on their priority advocacy issues. Access to justice and legal empowerment are important tools to advance transparency, accountability and citizen participation—essential goals of the Open Government Partnership (OGP). The OGP process, in turn, can help to strengthen access to justice by developing shared commitments to make justice institutions more open, accountable and responsive to all people.

Access to justice and legal empowerment are important tools to advance transparency, accountability and citizen participation—essential goals of the Open Government Partnership (OGP). The OGP process, in turn, can help to strengthen access to justice by developing shared commitments to make justice institutions more open, accountable and responsive to all people.

A review of OGP national commitments shows that OGP National Action Plans (NAPs) are increasingly being used to advance judicial transparency, open justice data and combat violence against women. By 2017, more than 10% of all NAP commitments were related to justice, but there is still much more that can be done. Learn more about the OGP Summit taking place May 29-31, 2019 in Ottawa, Canada and how we can leverage this moment to advance access to justice in your context.

Panelists

You can access the slides shown during the webinar here: OGP & Year of Justice Webinar (3.7 MB)

If you were unable to attend the webinar, you can access a recording of the webinar.


Justice For All Coalition Calls - Get Involved
(Ali Hassan) #2

Thanks for sharing this useful information


(John Kamma) #3

Thanks for sharing. Well noted!


(Som Prasad Niroula) #4

How to join the webinar?


(Madeline Gunderson) #5

Thank you for all of your thoughtful questions during this webinar! As we didn’t have time to answer all of them, I will copy some of them here below:

  • @SandraElena: Does the government of Argentina have an integrated Information Management System that gathers data from all the administration of justice institutions? It have been a that is not readily acceptable in our country because of corruption and other issues.
  • @donnyard: Do defence lawyers in Indonesia challenge the concept of legal aid as it takes away from their business? This has been an issue in Pakistan.
  • @donnyard Does the private sector also finance the national legal aid scheme?
  • Do your countries engage the local cultural/traditional/ informal sector in the provision of legal aid? if yes how? if not why?
  • @ncamburian: You spoke about commitments going missing between different drafts of the National Action Plan, can you talk about what you did when that happened, how did you get commitments back in - what were some of the tactics that you used?
  • @ncamburian: I’m wondering how citizens will be legally empowered through the paralegal service because we know that even if a supply-side service is provided doesn’t necessarily mean people feel they can access it, can you explain?
  • We (LANDnet Uganda) are members of the Working Group on Land Justice which an opportunity to share issues and strategize on land justice, OGP meetings are rarely convened due to finances which has affected implementation of the recommendations made in the plan.
  • @SandraElena Hi, we are from the Criminal Court No. 10 of the City of Buenos Aires. We started implementing open data policies three year ago. We would like to know if you know any other courts worldwide that implement open data policies. Specially because we believe in our field there is a collision between open data policies and the protection of personal data. PS: Special thanks to Sandra Elena for inviting us to participate.
  • How do you involve non-justice related institutions (i.e. police, prosecution, judiciary and prisons), for example the health department is key in improving medico-legal protocols in cases of sexual assault?
  • What exact data /categories, papers, info on progress of the case, civil, administrative, criminal, etc/ does Open judicial data portal provide?
  • What about the idea of a social impact bond, where cost saved to government is calculated into an upfront bond, as a way to fund civil society organizations engage with promoting access to justice and legal empowerment? Could this idea be considered into the OGP to sustain Access to justice initiatives?
  • Do you know how successfully these commitments have been implemented over time? either overall or if you are only familiar with your country case, that is fine too.
  • Are there many commitments or initiatives related to opening police data? We are working hard on this issue in the US and here in Texas so I am curious where else police data transparency is a major priority.

As well as a few updates from our participants as well:

  • This is Alisa from Task Force on Justice at Pathfinders. An update on our end - we are working with Canada, Argentina, OSJI and OECD to prepare a high level panel during OGP Summit (this may be the same event Sandra Elena mentioned) The Task Force on Justice report will also be published prior to the OGP summit.
  • A comment for the Indonesia action plan. As a former IRM researcher, it is very exciting to see such specific outcomes outlined in a national action plan. I hope the implementation meets these goals.


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