What is the view out of your window?

@Mohamed_Sankoh wrote:

Hello, can you please tell me a little about your country America.

Best regards.

Hi Mohamed! Thanks for reaching out. I am the one who answers emails to community@namati.org these days… usually to provide helpdesk support for members needing help with their accounts and to answer questions about the network from prospective members. As an existing member, the best way to connect is by logging into the forum, where you can meet and get to know other network members as well.

As I’m sure you know, the United States of America is a large, diverse country, not unlike your own country of Sierra Leone. Myself, I am based in the Pacific Northwest near Seattle, on an island called Bainbridge Island. I am happy to be living here and it’s quite a nice place, surrounded by water, big evergreen trees and even deer! Here’s a photo I took this morning out of my own window.

This week we are struggling with very bad air quality resulting from big forest fires in Canada, just to the north of us. Forest fires seem to have become a feature of our summers which is very unfortunate. Even if the fires are far away, the bad air is dangerous and keeps us indoors which I don’t like because I enjoy taking long walks through my neighborhood every day. Apparently right now our air is the third worst in the world, but I’m told it will get better soon.

What is the view out of your window?

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Nice view Tobias,

Well, I can tell you there’s certainly no deer from my window maybe just a couple of neighborhood dogs :smile: and pretty much high-rise apartments. I remember though in Highschool we had deer in our compound and we would spend our weekends chasing them around. The air is decent in Nairobi although slightly dusty now as we ponder how to move our rivers @mustafa_mahmoud @lauragoodwin @yasahkym i’m calling this the view challenge if I may @tobiaseigen

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Well if I look through my seating room window I see a church and a school playground and it’s the dusty side of my house as the road is not tarmaced. The bedroom window I have a view of a hotel corridor that blocks my view of the sunrise. I dread for such views as those of @lauragoodwin who views the highway consuming and @tobiaseigen who can see wild life. :see_no_evil:. Meanwhile let me enjoy the church view.

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Thanks, Mohammed!

The deer here are really too tame. You would probably be able to catch them! Mostly I just try to prevent them from eating all my flowers! :sunflower:

I went to high school in Nairobi too - the International School of Kenya. Back then the school was in the middle of a coffee plantation. I recall seeing monkeys in the trees, but don’t remember deer or other animals. I have a fond memory of the birds around campus - kites circling overhead, weaver birds, starlings…

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I would never have guessed that you went to school in Kenya more so at ISK. We used to have outreach activities against drugs and substance abuse by the Eastern Africa Regional Youth Network supported by the UNODC just fresh from high school and one of the schools where we had the programs was ISK. This was back around 2010 and so this is quite a small world.

I think @mustafa_mahmoud and I would take the bad air @tobiaseigen if it came with the deer.

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That’s really great to hear - small world, indeed. :slight_smile: I went to ISK a little earlier, graduating in 1990. The graduation ceremony was at kenyatta center! Nairobi was a smaller town then and that was a more innocent time in terms of drugs and substance use… though there were some American classmates of mine who had to go back to USA because of drugs problems. It’s interesting to learn that you were doing outreach activities there 20 years later. Good for you and thank you!

I sometimes feel like I’m too far away from Kenya here but try to stay closer by getting up very early in the morning so at least our workday overlaps a few hours! I also like to come visit whenever I can - looks like I will be coming this fall again.

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1990 I think I was about 5 then, those were indeed simpler times or so I’ve heard. Kenya has certainly come a long way maybe in equal measure of success and challenges, drugs are now a menace here much like almost everywhere else I think.

Nice to hear you’re coming back, Kenya welcomes you back and I know there are some people who would be excited to see you back @makkahyusuf @zena @Naima_Rajab for take two of the “Viazi Karai eating meeting” and maybe we’ll try another fish joint @mustafa_mahmoud @lauragoodwin or Mama Oliech Reloaded assuming that she’s not on “riparian land”

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I like this topic @tobiaseigen and enjoyed reading the responses from @Cnior + @mustafa_mahmoud. I am looking at my flower garden in full bloom :sunflower:! I live in Northern California, in a coastal town called Fort Bragg.

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I really wouldn’t mind that view @amandapadilla. That’s a beautiful garden :white_flower: and looks like it’s warm outside too unlike Nairobi which is quite chilly. I’m sure you’re happy there’s no deer around with such a bountiful garden. I feel like if @tobiaseigen had this he would camp out or rather there would be no deer left :wink:

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I love to hear all these beautiful stories about America. A very lovely and democratic place I wish to visit one day to see all wild forests, tamed and wild animals and also to get to know the culture of Americans.

All the best.

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Thanks @Cnior! It is actually chilly here right now as well. Deer do come around but our small dog (who thinks she is a lion) scares them off.

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@amandapadilla @tobiaseigen this is my view. Don’t mind the owner of the view, she is very possessive of her view. :wink:

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@mustafa_mahmoud The cutest little view there is!

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Thanks @amandapadilla

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My view from my window are plantain trees and their sucker’s growing up beside them and after they bear fruits and are ripe enough to be harvested. They are cut down and the little ones take over the journey and it goes for them and their generations to come. No complains just grow up, product your fruits and get cut down[quote=“amandapadilla, post:8, topic:46346, full:true”] I like this topic @tobiaseigen and enjoyed reading the responses from @Cnior + @mustafa_mahmoud. I am looking at my flower garden in full bloom :sunflower:! I live in Northern California, in a coastal town called Fort Bragg.

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***[quote=“amandapadilla, post:8, topic:46346, full:true”] I like this topic @tobiaseigen and enjoyed reading the responses from @Cnior + @mustafa_mahmoud. I am looking at my flower garden in full bloom :sunflower:! I live in Northern California, in a coastal town called Fort Bragg.

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This is my window view, I provide food to support the birds and squirrels, I also provide warm shelter for hedgehogs when I find them in my garden during winter, I feed them during the winter season and release them to nature again at the end of the season, as they get less to eat when it’s frozen and extremely cold times. I’m slowly building a strong relationship with the birds and mammals and enjoy doing this.

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Michael it’s a beautiful work to provide for the birds and animals at their hour of needs, thanks brother and keep up the good work

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This is Tana River passing through Garissa County, I recently travelled to this region for about 4 days, this was the view from the car’s window. The area is susceptible to drought, Terrorism, No development, lack of education very poor infrastructure, floods (2020 it displaced 17,000 people). How can this River appear so calm yet cause havoc at the same time? The same water is used by terrorists to transport weapons of mass destruction. The male children look after livestock whilst the female children sell milk from camels, there is no scent of education. Who is to blame?

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Wow! Thank you @Timotistic12 for reawakening this great topic and thank you also @MichaelEhiem and @LindaMakau for sharing photos! I’d love to see more photos of views out of windows of network members around the world.

Timothy, your description of the view out your window is like a parable with words for all of us to live by. Thank you. If you are able to share a photo, we’d love to see it.

Michael, I live in USA but am German and go back to Germany regularly, so recognize the bird feeder design from my neighborhood in Berlin. :heart_eyes_cat: Love that you feed and take care of the birds, squirrels and hedgehogs in your neighborhood, especially in the wintertime when food is more scarce. In Berlin, my father also feeds the birds and also a fox who visits in the garden.

I also feed the birds here in my garden on Bainbridge Island. Mostly I feed hummingbirds who are 100% reliant on the bird feeder so I diligently refill it with sugar water whenever it is empty. In winter the feeder freezes, so I get an exchange going so I can bring the frozen one inside and bring outside the thawed one, so they don’t starve. The other birds are more resilient and go further afield to find food, and of course many migrate south in winter. There is also a big grey squirrel who likes to come and eat all the food, who scares away the birds. One fascinating nature fact I learned last year is that chickadees (including those that come to my bird feeder!) cache their food and can remember where every bit of food is that they hid away somewhere. They need more food in winter so store more food, and to help them remember they actually grow the hiccocampus part of their brain for the season! :open_mouth:

As the colder months arrive, birds that remain in northern climates face the harsh realities of staying warm and finding food. Some birds approach the food problem by storing it in advance — a behavior called caching. Chickadees, nuthatches, jays, and some woodpeckers are known to cache large supplies of seeds in many places. But what enables birds such as this Black-capped Chickadee to find the seeds they’ve stored? They amplify spatial memory.

Linda, your photo and story is more serious than this lighthearted topic intends. Still, thank you so much for sharing. Maybe you can tell us more about your trip to Garissa, and your experiences there, in a new topic?

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Apologies for that. Yeah, sure.

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